Infrastructure Engineer

Infrastructure Engineer

Technology infrastructure refers to the assets an organization needs to make its technology applications function, including servers, computers, mobile devices and telecommunication networks. With the majority of financial transactions now occurring as electronic data transfers, financial services organizations are highly dependent on Information and Communications Technology (ICT) for day-to-day operations. Transferring funds, processing claims, providing customer service and fulfilling transactions are all made possible through the networks that Infrastructure Engineers design and maintain.

ROLE-AT-A-GLANCE
Binoculars
Demand Outlook
*

Employment opportunities for Infrastructure Engineers are expected to increase as financial institutions make more innovative use of technology.

Diploma
Education & Credentials
*

College/Undergraduate degree typically required.

Data chart
Quantitative Skills Required
*
Group of people
Interpersonal Skills & Relationship Management
*
Multiple devices Specialized Technology Skills
*
Desktop area Work Environment

Office or data centre; may work on rotating shifts to enable 24/7 operations

ROLE-AT-A-GLANCE
Binoculars
Demand Outlook
*

Employment opportunities for Infrastructure Engineers are expected to increase as financial institutions make more innovative use of technology.

Diploma
Education & Credentials
*

College/Undergraduate degree typically required.

Data chart
Quantitative Skills Required
*
Group of people
Interpersonal Skills & Relationship Management
*
Multiple devices Specialized Technology Skills *
Desktop area Work Environment

Office or data centre; may work on rotating shifts to enable 24/7 operations


WHAT IT IS

Key Role Dimensions

Designing and maintaining the backbone of an organization’s technology: Understand available technology and the organization’s operations to develop solutions that meet the organization’s internal and customer-facing needs.

Enabling the safekeeping of organizational data and information: Protect sensitive customer information from breaches in security.

Focus Areas

An Infrastructure Engineer’s duties fall into two main areas:

  • Adding new components to existing IT infrastructure: For example, ensure sufficient network capacity, data storage and information security for a new telephone banking application. 
  • Maintaining and troubleshooting existing IT infrastructure: For example, ensure that servers running applications are up-to-date and working efficiently; if there is a technology failure, resolve the issue and return the network to full operation.

WHAT IT TAKES TO SUCCEED

Key Job Accountabilities

Infrastructure Engineers generally engage in:

Infrastructure Design & Development:

  • Assess and identify changes needed in the current infrastructure in line with changing requirements; interact with business managers to determine needs.

 Infrastructure Implementation:

  • Manage implementation of technology and infrastructure changes and communicate customer needs to the technology implementation team.
  • Test and maintain recovery procedures for problems such as data loss, user error or network failure.

 Infrastructure Maintenance:

  • Review existing infrastructure to identify opportunities for improvement.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of back-up procedures and contingency plans.
  • Develop and execute plans to ensure infrastructure is maintained in a timely manner (e.g. ensure servers are replaced before they become obsolete).

Infrastructure Problem Resolution:

  • Address and resolve problems and incidents as they arise.
  • Establish procedures to guide problem identification and resolution processes, and a system of controls and reports for managing the resolution process.

Knowledge, Skills & Experience

Must-haves:

  • Knowledge of technology infrastructure and computer software applications
  • Expertise in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) – programming and design
  • Expertise in computer programming and hardware configuration
  • Ability to multitask while maintaining strong attention to detail
  • Analytical Thinking: Problem-solving and reasoning skills
  • Project & Change Management: Must be conscious of potential issues arising from technology implementations

 Nice-to-haves:

  • Previous experience in infrastructure design and support
  • Previous experience in application and operating system development
  • Previous experience as a database analyst or designer

Education & Credentials

Entry-level positions typically require:

  • College diploma or
  • Undergraduate university degree

In the fields of:

  • Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Mathematics

 Employers in different segments may require candidates to possess one or more of these designations:

 Additional areas for training may include:

  • MS SQL Server Reporting
  • Tools such as Perl, Python, Bash, AWK

Information Technology Infrastructure Library Management

Programs Offered

University of Waterloo


WHERE IT CAN TAKE YOU

Career Pathways

There are a number of pathways open to Infrastructure Engineers through:

  • Deeper Specialization: Organizations are increasingly recognizing and rewarding experts in specialized technology areas.
  • Increased Seniority: You may choose to move into the Infrastructure Architect role, which is responsible for developing the long-term strategy for the organization’s technology infrastructure (e.g. choice of platforms, decision to focus more on distributed systems, etc.). You may eventually move into leadership roles such as Director or VP of Infrastructure Engineering.
  • Lateral Career Move: Common options include application/systems development or project management roles.

Future Trends & Impacts

There are several external factors and environmental trends that can have a strong impact on this role:

  • Technology Change: Ongoing technology change requires Infrastructure Engineers to commit to continual learning and skill upgrading.  
  • Complexity of Technology: Financial services’ dependence on increasingly complex technology will raise the demand for and pressure on Infrastructure Engineers.
  • Unplanned Situations & Emergencies: Power outages, fires, etc.


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